Global Sources
EE Times-India
Stay in touch with EE Times India
 
EE Times-India > Power/Alternative Energy
 
 
Power/Alternative Energy  

Going carbon negative: Designing EVs for the environment

Posted: 04 Mar 2016     Print Version  Bookmark and Share

Keywords:George Washington University  Vanderbilt University  electric vehicle  lithium-ion batteries  carbon negative 

In lithium-ion batteries, the nanotubes replace the carbon anode used in commercial batteries. The team demonstrated that the carbon nanotubes gave a small boost to the performance, which was amplified when the battery was charged quickly. In sodium-ion batteries, the researchers found that small defects in the carbon, which can be tuned using STEP, can unlock stable storage performance over 3.5 times above that of sodium-ion batteries with graphite electrodes. Most importantly, both carbon-nanotube batteries were exposed to about 2.5 months of continuous charging and discharging and showed no sign of fatigue.

Depending on the specifications, making one of the two electrodes out of carbon nanotubes means that up to 40 per cent of a battery could be made out of recycled CO2, Pint estimated. This does not include the outer protective packaging but he suggested that processes like STEP could eventually produce the packaging as well.

Cary Pint

Figure 2: Pint: Our efforts have shown a path to achieve such a future.

The researchers estimate that with a battery cost of $325/kWh (the average cost of lithium-ion batteries reported by the Department of Energy in 2013), a kilogram of carbon dioxide has a value of about $18 as a battery material, six times more than when it is converted to methanol, a number that only increases when moving from large batteries used in electric vehicles to the smaller batteries used in electronics. And unlike methanol, combining batteries with solar cells provides renewable power with zero greenhouse emissions, which is needed to put an end to the current carbon cycle that threatens future global sustainability.

image name

Figure 3: Licht: In addition to better batteries other applications for the carbon nanotubes include carbon composites for strong, lightweight construction materials.

Licht also proposed that the STEP process could be coupled to a natural gas powered electrical generator. The generator would provide electricity, heat and a concentrated source of carbon dioxide that would boost the performance of the STEP process. At the same time, the oxygen released in the process could be piped back to the generator where it would boost the generator's combustion efficiency to compensate for the amount of electricity that the STEP process consumes. The end result could be a fossil fuel electrical power plant with zero net CO2 emissions.

"Imagine a world where every new electric vehicle or grid-scale battery installation would not only enable us to overcome the environmental sins of our past, but also provide a step toward a sustainable future for our children," said Pint. "Our efforts have shown a path to achieve such a future."

Co-authors of the paper with Licht and Pint include Anna Douglas, graduate student in the interdisciplinary materials science programme at Vanderbilt; Rachel Carter, graduate student in mechanical engineering at Vanderbilt; Jiawen Ren, postdoctoral associate in chemistry at George Washington University; and Matthew Lefler, graduate student in chemistry at George Washington University.

The research was partially supported by National Science Foundation grants 123-732 and 1505830 and NSF Graduate Research Fellowship grant 1445197.


 First Page Previous Page 1 • 2



Comment on "Going carbon negative: Designing EVs..."
Comments:  
*  You can enter [0] more charecters.
*Verify code:
 
 
Webinars

Seminars

Visit Asia Webinars to learn about the latest in technology and get practical design tips.

 

Go to top             Connect on Facebook      Follow us on Twitter      Follow us on Orkut

 
Back to Top